Maybe.

The possibility that you might say “yes” or “no” at any time. The possibility that you might oscillate between “I have a problem” and “I do not have a problem”.

Ambivalence is expected and normal in recovery from mental health concerns. So getting to maybe is actually a fundamental turning point. It might be a slow-moving vehicle but has wheels nonetheless and moves you in a direction of change.

For example, the maybe can be even just accepting the idea that you have a problem with your mood. You might not agree to a diagnosis, but you can say maybe I feel low, and maybe I have depression. Whether you do or don’t is not entirely imperative at this point, it’s the self-awareness that’s important.

Self-awareness can be an omnipresent essence or it can be a lingering breeze in your life. Being self-aware means you are in tune to how you truly feel- in that exact moment- which might change over the course of a day, hours, even minutes. Self-awareness applies not only to your feelings but to your values, behaviours and even relationships.

In the depths of my mental illness, my self-awareness was simply that although I didn’t want to be alive, I could see that maybe there was a future for me out there waiting to be lived with all of the people that I love.

You see how maybe sneaks its way in there? Maybe is almost a hopeful word to some people, including myself. The chance for the possibility seems higher than plain old no.

Getting to maybe is an achievement. It may not feel like much when you have so far (so you think!) to go in your mental health journey but it really is the point at which things start to click in your brain. You work harder to get to a definitive answer. You try new things to see if they work for you. Maybe opens doors that were previously locked.

So if you’re contemplating your mental health right now- then good for you for getting to maybe! It’s truly the first step to being well.

My name is Tara, and I maybe addicted to Pinterest. 😉

About the Author

Tara Richardson is a Peer Support Specialist at Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences in Whitby, Ontario. Her own personal journey through mental illness has led her to be a passionate and dedicated advocate for mental health recovery. Tara is an aspiring author who is in the (long) process of writing and editing her memoir compiled from journal entries beginning at age 11. Tara has a B.A. in Psychology, a diploma in Social Service Work, and a certificate in Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Tara can be contacted at: tara_richardson913@hotmail.com Non-creepy fan mail gladly welcomed.